Gatos y Galletas: New Mexico’s First Cat Cafe

Gatos y Galletas: New Mexico’s First Cat Cafe

UPDATE, December 2016: Gatos y Galletas is now closed. But, if everything goes smoothly, a dog cafe will soon be opening in Albuquerque. If and when that happens, I’ll make sure to post about it. Cute cats and hot drinks are a natural combination, so it may be surprising that the first cafe to officially combine the two opened in Taipei, Taiwan, only 19 years ago. The concept hopped over to Japan, where stressed workers who lived in pet-less apartments made the…

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The Mysterious Mothman of West Virginia

The Mysterious Mothman of West Virginia

Oh, Mothman. I never quite understood you. I mean, you seemed cool and all, but you were just some spooky dude with big wings and red eyes. All my friends in the regions of Tumblr’s cryptid zones thought you were so cool, the Hot New Cryptid, the Man (Moth?) of the Month. But now? After visiting your hometown where they put up a statue of you and started a museum and host a festival every year? Okay, I’m starting to see it…

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In Defense of The Museum of Jurassic Technology, Los Angeles

In Defense of The Museum of Jurassic Technology, Los Angeles

The Museum of Jurassic Technology in Culver City, LA, is strange little place. I could try to describe it room by room, with accurate nouns and such, but a literal retelling of my trip won’t do it justice. Plus, I don’t want to spoil it for you, in case you ever end up going. It’s like The Sixth Sense – better if you don’t know the twists, although still worth your time if you do. So. Imagine a wealthy gentleman from an alternate dimension has…

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Visiting Hiroshima

Visiting Hiroshima

Hiroshima is three hours away from Kyoto and five hours away from Tokyo by shinkansen. It’s far too long to make a day trip out of it and not near too much of interest, and yet thousands of foreigners still stop by when they’re in Japan. The bombing of Hiroshima by the US is modern history, but after the bombings, Hiroshima the city slowly slid out of the Western mind. The bombings were behind fifty years of growth, healing, and history…

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New Project to Watch: Lifepack

New Project to Watch: Lifepack

I’m always looking cool, innovative new gear, especially on crowdfunding platforms like Kickstarter and IndieGoGo. Recently, I stumbled across a neat project called Lifepack. Lifepack’s got a sleek design, separate spaces for clothes and work gear, a solar charger, integrated lock, RFID-blocking hidden pockets, and a water-resistant finish. There’s a few things I’m tentative about, but a few things I like  a lot. First, the positives. The creators have a pretty good track record – they’ve already got one well-received project under their…

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The Search for the Elusive Women’s Technical Clothing

The Search for the Elusive Women’s Technical Clothing

The search for the perfect travel garment is an experience fraught with sticker shock and weeding through pages of shapeless, overly pocketed clothes. For every check on the “perfect” list, there’s at least one on the “skip it” list. Found some pants are light and don’t wrinkle? They’re hot in the summer and have a pocket count to make a geologist blush. Find a shirt that’s comfortable and cool in the heat? Mark my words, it’ll wrinkle like no one’s business. I keep searching for the…

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Museum of Man’s Cannibals: Myth & Reality Special Exhibit

Museum of Man’s Cannibals: Myth & Reality Special Exhibit

I love museums. Love ’em. I love how involving and interactive they can be, how they can bring people together, how intuitive and enjoyable they are compared to typical educational experiences. This means that when I hit up a new city, I’m always checking sites like Atlas Obscura for quirky museums I might have otherwise missed. I also follow quite a few offbeat blogs that keep me updated about oddities, which is how I learned about the Museum of Man’s new exhibit on Cannibalism. An…

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On my experience at NTHU

On my experience at NTHU

(Originally posted here.) What follows is a long post  with no pictures. Sorry, folks. My intention here isn’t to rant. It’s to provide more information to curious friends, as well as students who are considering NTHU for exchange. Perhaps some of the issues I’m about to discuss are new problems or may be solved in the near future, but last semester was one frustrating experience after another. You should know a few things up front: first, I’m attending UNM on a…

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It’s Okay if You Can’t Drop Everything and Travel

It’s Okay if You Can’t Drop Everything and Travel

I’m sure you’ve seen the posts before, if you’ve spent any time in the travel blogosphere: You Can Drop Everything And Travel! How to Travel on Nothing!  Why Travel Excuses Are Bull$#!*! And so on. The refrain is obvious: if you want to travel and you think you can’t you’re lying to yourself. And honestly, that’s a rough thing to hear from a blogger you respect. The “just get out there and do it” motto is fine, and some people…

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Albuquerque: An Overly Opinionated Guide

Albuquerque: An Overly Opinionated Guide

(What the heck is an Overly Opinionated Guide?) Ahh, Albuquerque: home of Breaking Bad, the Southwest’s little Hollywood, frequent butt of jokes because of how difficult it is to spell. (Say it “al-boo-kwer-kew” in your head – we all do.) Interested in visiting this interesting city in the Land of Enchantment? Read on! CLIMATE: Albuquerque is two things all year round: high and dry. If you’re not used to the altitude and you let yourself get dehydrated, things will go downhill very quickly. Pack…

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